ACCOMODATION IN CZECH REPUBLIC

Housing Estate

A housing estate is a group of homes and other buildings built together as a single development. The exact form may vary from country to country. Accordingly, a housing estate is usually built by a single contractor, with only a few styles of house or building design, so they tend to be uniform in appearance. In European cities such as Czech, Spain and Prague, an estate may range from detached houses to high density tower blocks with or without commercial facilities; in Europe and America, these may take the form of town housing, or the older-style rows of terraced houses associated with the industrial revolution, detached or semi-detached houses with small plots of land around them forming gardens, and are frequently without commercial facilities. Housing estates are the usual form of residential design used in new towns, where estates are designed as an autonomous suburb, centered on a small commercial centre. Such estates are usually designed to minimize through-traffic flows, and to provide recreational space in the form of parks and greens.

Prague Town Houses

Prague is the capital and largest city of the Czech Republic. It is the fourteenth-largest city in the European Union. It is also the historical capital of Bohemia. Situated in the north-west of the country on the Vltava River, the city is home to about 1.24 million people, while its larger urban zone is estimated to have a population of nearly 2 million. The city has a temperate climate, with warm summers and chilly winters. Prague Townhouses are generally rows of terraced houses, often in typical regional style set around communal gardens with a pool. Townhouse complexes are increasingly popular around large towns and cities, particularly Madrid, where there are vast suburbs lined with row upon row of townhouses. In coastal resorts townhouses are often built in a style known as the ‘Mediterranean village’ and houses may be white-washed or, as is increasingly popular nowadays, painted in shades of blue and yellow. Townhouses are usually spacious and often have three or four floors, including a basement for a garage and storage, and a roof area with a roof terrace known as a solarium. Townhouses generally have little outside space or garden except for a small patch at the front and back, often paved as a patio. Construction tends to be recent and is generally of reasonable to good quality.

Student Housing

Most universities in the Czech Republic offers student housing in their own dormitories. To find information about the school’s own housing facilities, you can look for “koleje” or “dormitories” on the respective institute websites.

Hotels

Hotels in Prague are now just as expensive as anywhere in western Europe, but the standard of hotel accommodation has improved enormously over the past decade, and Prague offers everything from beautifully restored historic buildings, to boutique hotels created by cutting-edge designers. Outside of the capital, hotel rates - and standards - are a bit lower, though there are certainly high-end hotels in major cities such as Brno and Ostrava, and in popular resorts like Karlovy Vary and Cesky Krumlov.

Bed and breakfast

A pension is usually a small, family-run place with up to half a dozen rooms. These are a bit like a British bed and breakfast, though slightly more formal, and they tend to be more common than hotels in rural areas.

Camping

Most Czech campsites offer pitches for both tents and caravans, with a communal shower and toilet block. Some also have chaty - basic, unheated huts or bungalows that you can rent by the night. Most are open from about March through October

Other accommodation

Hostels: These can range from dedicated backpacker accommodation in Prague and other popular locations, to dorms in student halls of residence or sporting club facilities. A number of youth hostels in the Czech Republic are affiliated with Hostelling International; several of these are located in Prague. Contact the Czech Youth Hostel Association for more information.

Apartments: Prague offers an ever-increasing number of private apartments available for short-term rental, and these can prove much better value than a hotel.

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